Ancient Greece - Buildings

BLOG THEME: Temples and other buildings of ancient Greece. Some of the photos are taken by me but there are also reblogs or links to pics/sites I like. Also, this blog covers only the era then Greek city states were still independent or part of the Hellenistic empire.

My other tumblr pages:
Ancient Rome - Architecture
Medieval Europe in Pics
Roman And Greek Art
Art G4llery
History In Pics
Gatticat
Zillion Wonders of the World

As for following you - this is a secondary blog so I can't follow you back under this name even I would like to. I follow though a lots of blogs and i've tried to record their URL:s into my "I follow" pages. (this page / one of the above mentioned)

House of the Doric Capital

* Morgantina, Sicily

* Hellenistic era

italian-landscapes:

Metaponto, Basilicata, Italy

Metaponto was one of the Greek colonies in Southern Italy (8th-3rd C bC). All the cities were won and absorbed by ancient Romans.

Google Maps

(via last-of-the-romans)

Ruins of Hellenikon pyramid near Argos 
It’s the oldest pyramid of Greece and dates back to 2700-2800 BCE.
Greek pyramids

Ruins of Hellenikon pyramid near Argos

It’s the oldest pyramid of Greece and dates back to 2700-2800 BCE.

Greek pyramids

Delphi valley, Athenian treasury (510 to 480 BCE) in the front

Weather was “a bit” sunnier when we visited the place :). Walking up the valley and seeing all the steep hills and great buildings must have been quite an experience.

October 2008

thebacchant:

The temple of Apollo, located in Delphi, Greece. Delphi was originally home to Mother Earth, Gaea and guarded by the Python. Apollo slayed the Python and took over, making Delphi his sacred/ worship spot.


The temple was primarily where (male) citizens would go to seek the Delphic Oracle, Pythia (priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity) to learn about their prophecy. Citizens never had direct contact with her; whatever the Pythia prophesied, a male priest would repeat back to the citizen asking.


The Pythia had to be a female virgin and sat on a tripod over the Adyton, which is the crack in the Earth, where apparently the Python’s body was that was rotting, in which the Pythia would inhale the vapors from the earth to bring her into a “trance-like” state of being, where she would prophesize about the future of those who wanted answers. There is another theory that she may of chewed laurel leaves (which are poisonous) or she drank undiluted wine.

A great photo; Delphi is such a breathtaking place - no wonder that ancient Greeks regarded it sacred

(via last-of-the-romans)

colehowcouldyou:

Facade of the Tomb of Philip II (father of Alexander the Great). Aigai (modern Vergina).

colehowcouldyou:

Facade of the Tomb of Philip II (father of Alexander the Great). Aigai (modern Vergina).

(via youaretheachillestomypatroclus)

celzmccelz:

The Acropolis, as seen from the Pnyx. 

This is a great photo; I would probably buy it, if it was a postcard. When we were in Athens I would have liked to visit Pnyx, but unfortunately didn’t have time. I regret it now ;).

mythologyofthepoetandthemuse:

~Memory by memory the step~

just-wanna-travel:

Agrigento, Italy

(via last-of-the-romans)